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ABNF J. 2006 Spring;17(2):73-7.

Spiritual well-being, religious coping, and the quality of life of African American breast cancer treatment: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Nursing, Fayetteville State University, NC 28301, USA. pmorgan@uncfsu.edu

Abstract

There is a dearth of knowledge about the quality of life of African American women during the breast cancer treatment phase. This pilot study explored spiritual wellbeing, religious coping, and the quality of life of African American women during the breast cancer treatment phase. The sample included a total of 11 African American women from the mid-Atlantic and southeastern United States. The Roy Adaptation Model (Roy & Andrews, 1999) served as a guide for this study. This pilot study used a descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were analyzed utilizing descriptive statistics and the Spearman rho correlational analysis. African American women used more positive religious coping than negative religious coping. Significant relationships were found between spiritual well-being and the QOL domains of physical, emotional, and functional well-being. These findings suggest that nurses should incorporate spiritual and religious support in the care of African American women during the breast cancer treatment phase.

PMID:
18402347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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