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J Am Coll Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;56(5):491-8. doi: 10.3200/JACH.56.5.491-498.

Prevalence and correlates of self-injury among university students.

Author information

1
Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA. sgollust@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors' purpose in this research was to establish estimates of the prevalence and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury among university students.

PARTICIPANTS:

The authors recruited participants (N = 2,843) from a random sample of 5,021 undergraduate and graduate students attending a large midwestern public university.

METHODS:

Using an Internet-based survey, the authors measured the prevalence of self-injury and potential risk factors, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, suicidal thoughts, and negative health behaviors.

RESULTS:

Seven percent of students reported any self-injury over the previous 4 weeks. Factors associated with a significantly higher likelihood (p <.05) of self-injury included cigarette smoking, concurrent depressive and anxiety disorders, and for men, growing up in a family of low socioeconomic status and having symptoms of eating disorders. Only 26% of those who reported self-injury received mental health therapy or medication in the previous year.

CONCLUSIONS:

Students who harm themselves experience high anxiety and distress, yet are unlikely to seek help.

PMID:
18400660
DOI:
10.3200/JACH.56.5.491-498
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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