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J Appl Microbiol. 2008 Sep;105(3):706-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.03783.x. Epub 2008 Apr 9.

Dietary glycated protein modulates the colonic microbiota towards a more detrimental composition in ulcerative colitis patients and non-ulcerative colitis subjects.

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1
School of Chemistry, Food Biosciences and Pharmacy, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the effect of native, heated and glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the ulcerative colitis (UC) and non-UC colonic microbiota in vitro.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Continuous flow culture (CFC) models of the human colonic microbiota inoculated with faeces from UC and non-UC volunteers were maintained on BSA as growth substrate. Changes in bacterial populations and short-chain fatty acids were determined. UC and non-UC microbiota differed significantly in microbial populations, with elevated numbers of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and clostridia in the microbiota from UC patients. Compared with native BSA, glycated BSA modulated the gut microbiota of UC patients in vitro towards a more detrimental community structure with significant increases in putatively harmful bacteria (clostridia, bacteroides and SRB; P < 0.009) and decreases in dominant and putatively beneficial bacterial groups (eubacteria and bifidobacteria; P < 0.0004). The levels of beneficial short-chain fatty acids were significantly decreased by heated or glycated BSA, but were increased significantly by native BSA.

CONCLUSION:

The UC colonic microbiota maintained in CFC was significantly modified by glycated BSA.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

Results suggest that dietary glycated protein may impact upon the composition and activity of the colonic microbiota, an important environmental variable in UC.

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