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Clin Neurophysiol. 2008 Jun;119(6):1431-42. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2008.02.015. Epub 2008 Apr 7.

Changes in the activity of the cerebral cortex relate to postural response modification when warned of a perturbation.

Author information

1
Neurological Sciences Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, OR, USA. JJacobs@uvm.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether the cerebral cortex contributes to modifying upcoming postural responses to external perturbations when provided with prior warning of the perturbation.

METHODS:

Electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials were recorded from 12 healthy human subjects (21-32 years of age) before perturbing their balance with backward translations of a platform under their feet. The subjects responded with and without a visual cue that warned them 2s before the perturbation (the Cue and No Cue conditions, respectively).

RESULTS:

Contingent negative variation (CNV) was evident before perturbation onset in only the Cue condition. In the Cue condition, the subjects also produced smaller center of pressure (CoP) displacements than in the No Cue condition. The cue-related difference in the subjects' CNV potentials correlated with the cue-related difference in their CoP displacements. No significant associations existed among the CNV potentials and any cue-related postural adjustments made before the perturbation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cortical activity before an externally triggered perturbation associates with modifications of the ensuing postural response.

SIGNIFICANCE:

This is the first study to demonstrate a cortical correlate for changes in central postural set that modify externally triggered postural responses based on anticipation.

PMID:
18397840
PMCID:
PMC2443739
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2008.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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