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Eur Urol. 2009 Feb;55(2):499-507. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2008.03.073. Epub 2008 Apr 1.

Chronic pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in both sexes: analysis of 2749 participants of an urban health screening project.

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1
Department of Urology and Andrology, Donauspital, Vienna, Austria. martin.marszalek@wienkav.at

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies question the role of the prostate as the key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS).

OBJECTIVE:

To compare symptoms related to CPPS and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in both sexes.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Participants of a voluntary health examination in Vienna.

INTERVENTION AND MEASUREMENTS:

All participants completed a detailed questionnaire containing the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), with the female homolog of each male anatomical term use on questionnaires for female participants, the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and additional questions on pelvic pain. Furthermore, all participants underwent a detailed health investigation performed by a general practitioner.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

The study cohort comprised 1768 men and 981 women. The mean NIH-CPSI was 7.2+/-0.1 in women and 3.8+/-0.2 in men (p<0.001). In subject up to the age of 70 yr, the NIH-CPSI was higher in women (p<0.001). The NIH-CPSI increased with age in men (p<0.001), yet not in women (p=0.4). The prevalence of symptoms suggestive of CPPS in this selected population was 5.7% in women and 2.7% in men, and was higher in premenopausal women (p=0.03). Until the age of 50 yr, NIH-CPSI pain score in women exceeded that of men (p<0.001). The mean IPSS was higher in women (p<0.001). Storage symptoms were higher in women up to 60 yr, and voiding symptoms were higher in men above 60 yr. In men and women with symptoms suggestive of CPPS, the mean IPSS was significantly higher compared with those without CPPS symptoms (p<0.001). Limitations of our study are (1) that a urological evaluation was not performed and (2) that the questionnaire was not formerly validated for females.

CONCLUSION:

The preponderance of CPPS in females raises questions about the etiological role of the prostate in all cases with chronic pelvic pain and suggests that other pathomechanisms are likely to be involved.

PMID:
18395963
DOI:
10.1016/j.eururo.2008.03.073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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