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Dev Dyn. 2008 May;237(5):1509-16. doi: 10.1002/dvdy.21534.

Mice with an anterior cleft of the palate survive neonatal lethality.

Author information

1
Section of Oral Biology, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

Abstract

Many genes are known to function in a region-specific manner in the developing secondary palate. We have previously shown that Shox2-deficient embryos die at mid-gestation stage and develop an anterior clefting phenotype. Here, we show that mice carrying a conditional inactivation of Shox2 in the palatal mesenchyme survive the embryonic and neonatal lethality, but develop a wasting syndrome. Phenotypic analyses indicate a delayed closure of the secondary palate at the anterior end, leading to a failed fusion of the primary and secondary palates. Consistent with a role proposed for Shox2 in skeletogenesis, Shox2 inactivation causes a significantly reduced bone formation in the hard palate, probably due to a down-regulation of Runx2 and Osterix. We conclude that the secondary palatal shelves are capable of fusion with each other, but fail to fuse with the primary palate in a developmentally delayed manner. Mice carrying an anterior cleft can survive neonatal lethality.

PMID:
18393307
PMCID:
PMC3010755
DOI:
10.1002/dvdy.21534
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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