Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Health Econ. 2008 Jul;27(4):871-887. doi: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2008.02.006. Epub 2008 Mar 4.

Maternal employment, breastfeeding, and health: evidence from maternity leave mandates.

Author information

1
Department of Economics, University of Toronto, 150 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G7; National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge MA, United States.
2
National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge MA, United States; Department of Economics, University of British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

Public health agencies around the world have renewed efforts to increase the incidence and duration of breastfeeding. Maternity leave mandates present an economic policy that could help achieve these goals. We study their efficacy, focusing on a significant increase in maternity leave mandates in Canada. We find very large increases in mothers' time away from work post-birth and in the attainment of critical breastfeeding duration thresholds. We also look for impacts of the reform on self-reported indicators of maternal and child health captured in our data. For most indicators we find no effect.

PMID:
18387682
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2008.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center