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Disabil Rehabil. 2008;30(8):569-76. doi: 10.1080/09638280701355827.

Falling between two stools; how a weak co-operation between the social security and the unemployment agencies obstructs rehabilitation of unemployed sick-listed persons.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. ulla-britt.eriksson@kau.se

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore significant factors behind the weak co-operation between local social insurance and unemployment agencies impairing the rehabilitation of unemployed sick-listed persons.

METHOD:

Individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews with main actors directly involved in the sick-listing and rehabilitation process were conducted in the year 2000. In all 39 persons were interviewed: 25 professionals (physicians, public employment and social insurance officers) and 14 clients. Data were analysed according to Grounded theory method.

RESULTS:

The majority of unemployed sick-listed persons were declared too sick to work and were erased from the unemployment registers. This measure weakened the incentives for co-operation between the two main rehabilitation actors. The implication was that the unemployed sick-listed persons lost the opportunity of the co-ordinated rehabilitation they were entitled to. Three significant factors behind this process were identified by the main actors: indistinct regulation of co-operation, shifting political goals over time and conflicting goals between agencies; the last factor mainly a consequence of the other two.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest that labour market changes and manifest political goals influence the rehabilitation efforts giving low priority to difficult-to-place individuals such as unemployed sick-listed persons. In fact, a labour market problem turns into a medical problem. The hypothesis needs further testing in quantitative studies.

PMID:
18382898
DOI:
10.1080/09638280701355827
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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