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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Apr;89(4):677-83. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.09.034.

Association of activity limitations and lower-limb explosive extensor power in ambulatory people with stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education, Sport and Leisure Studies, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Dave.Saunders@ed.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether the explosive lower-limb extensor power of the affected and unaffected sides, and any asymmetry, are associated with activity limitations after stroke.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional observational study of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Measurements made in a hospital clinical research facility.

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-dwelling (N=66) subjects with stroke who were independently ambulatory. Subjects' mean age was 72+/-10 years.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The lower-limb extensor power of each lower limb (in W/kg), performance of specific functional activities (comfortable walking velocity, Functional Reach Test, chair-rise time, Timed Up & Go test), and global indices of activity limitation (FIM instrument, Rivermead Mobility Index, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living).

RESULTS:

Low lower-limb extensor power in either lower limb was the principal factor from among the confounders we recorded that significantly (R(2) range, .21-.46) predicted the limitation of specific functional activities, and low lower-limb extensor power in either lower limb was the principal predictive factor for global indices of activity limitation (R(2) range, .13-.38). The degree of asymmetry of lower-limb extensor power between legs was low and had little or no predictive value.

CONCLUSIONS:

In ambulatory persons with stroke, activity limitations are associated with deficits in lower-limb extensor power of both lower limbs, and not the severity of any residual asymmetry. These findings suggest that interventions to increase lower-limb extensor power in both lower limbs might reduce activity limitations after stroke.

PMID:
18373998
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2007.09.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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