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Rev Port Pneumol. 2008 Mar-Apr;14(2):195-218.

The clinical use of exhaled nitric oxide in wheezing children.

[Article in English, Portuguese]

Author information

1
Departamento Universitário de Fisiopatologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Centro de Estudos de Patologia Respiratória). pmartinsalergo@gmail.com

Abstract

The body of published work on the role of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) in the study of bronchial inflammation allows it to be classed as a simple, non-invasive measurement that is very useful in evaluating asthmatic patients. During a prospective study into the effects of air pollution on the health of the population of Viseu (Saud'AR Project), children with a clinical history of wheezing were identified through using the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. Children later filled in a new standardised questionnaire and underwent skin-prick-tests, spirometry and FENO measurement. Their mean age was 7.8+/-1.1 years. Comparing those who wheezed in the 6 months before evaluation (n=27) with those who didn't, statistical differences for DeltaFEV1 (8% median versus 4.5%, p=0.0399) and for FENO (23 ppb median versus 12 ppb, p=0.0195, respectively) were observed. Concerning children who needed a bronchodilator in the six previous months (n=19) and those who didn't, there was also a statistically significant difference in FENO: 27 ppb median versus 11 ppb median, respectively; p<0.0001. When comparing children who needed an unscheduled medical appointment in the six months previous to the evaluation (n=9) and those who didn't, there was also significant differences for FE NO: 28 ppb median versus 13 ppb median, p=0.0029. In conclusion, the existence of symptoms seems to be better related to FE NO than spirometry.

PMID:
18363018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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