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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 May;47(5):593-602. doi: 10.1097/CHI.0b013e31816765f9.

Early childhood OCD: preliminary findings from a family-based cognitive-behavioral approach.

Author information

1
Drs. Freeman, Garcia, Coyne, Ale, Przeworski, Himle, and Leonard are with the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, Providence, RI; and Dr. Compton is with Duke University, Durham, NC.. Electronic address: Jennifer_Freeman@Brown.edu.
2
Drs. Freeman, Garcia, Coyne, Ale, Przeworski, Himle, and Leonard are with the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, Providence, RI; and Dr. Compton is with Duke University, Durham, NC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relative efficacy of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus family-based relaxation treatment (RT) for young children ages 5 to 8 years with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

METHOD:

Forty-two young children with primary OCD were randomized to receive 12 sessions of family-based CBT or family-based RT. Assessments were conducted before and after treatment by independent raters blind to treatment assignment. Primary outcomes included scores on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement.

RESULTS:

For the intent-to-treat sample, CBT was associated with a moderate treatment effect (d = 0.53), although there was not a significant difference between the groups at conventional levels. For the completer sample, CBT had a large effect (d = 0.85), and there was a significant group difference favoring CBT. In the intent-to-treat sample, 50% of children in the CBT group achieved remission as compared to 20% in the RT group. In the completer sample, 69% of children in the CBT group achieved a clinical remission compared to 20% in the RT group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results indicate that children with early-onset OCD benefit from a treatment approach tailored to their developmental needs and family context. CBT was effective in reducing OCD symptoms and in helping a large number of children achieve a clinical remission.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00055068.

Comment in

PMID:
18356758
PMCID:
PMC2820297
DOI:
10.1097/CHI.0b013e31816765f9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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