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J Clin Periodontol. 2008 Apr;35(4):356-63. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01209.x.

Tissue alterations after tooth extraction with and without surgical trauma: a volumetric study in the beagle dog.

Author information

1
Private Institute for Periodontology and Implantology, Munich, Germany. fickl@ipi-muc.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study is to evaluate whether tooth extraction without the elevation of a muco-periosteal flap has advantageous effects on the resorption rate after tooth extraction.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

In five beagle dogs polyether impressions were taken before the surgery. The roots of the first and second pre-molars (P(1) and P(2)) were extracted and the sites were assigned to one of the following treatments: treatment group (Tx) 1, no treatment; Tx 2, surgical trauma (flap elevation and repositioning); Tx 3, the extraction socket was filled with BioOss Collagen and closed with a free soft-tissue graft; Tx 4, after flap elevation and repositioning, the extraction socket was treated with BioOss Collagen and a free soft-tissue graft. Impressions were taken 2 and 4 months after surgery. The casts were scanned, matched together with baseline casts and evaluated with digital image analysis.

RESULTS:

The "flapless groups" demonstrated significant lower resorption rates both when using socket-preservation techniques and without. Furthermore, socket-preservation techniques yielded better results compared with not treating the socket.

CONCLUSION:

The results demonstrate that leaving the periosteum in place decreases the resorption rate of the extraction socket. Furthermore, the treatment of the extraction socket with BioOss Collagen and a free gingival graft seems beneficial in limiting the resorption process after tooth extraction.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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