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Vaccine. 2008 Apr 16;26(17):2142-53. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.01.050. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

The cost-effectiveness of a universal influenza vaccination program for adults aged 50-64 years in Australia.

Author information

1
The School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. AnthonyN@chw.edu.au

Abstract

Currently the Australian government funds universal influenza vaccine for all those aged > or =65 years under the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Annual vaccination rates in those aged 50-64 years are significantly lower than vaccination rates in those aged > or =65 years, and currently less than half those at high-risk of influenza-related complications aged 50-64 years are immunised. This study used a decision tree model to examine the cost-effectiveness of lowering the age threshold for the influenza NIP in Australia to include those aged 50-64 years. From a healthcare payer perspective, a new influenza vaccination policy would cost $8908/QALY gained. From a societal perspective, a new influenza vaccination policy would cost $8338/QALY gained. From a governmental perspective, a new influenza vaccination policy would cost $22,408/QALY gained. The most influential parameters in deterministic sensitivity analysis included: probability of death due to influenza, vaccine efficacy against mortality, vaccine uptake, vaccine cost, and vaccine administration cost. Influenza vaccination for people aged 50-64 years appears highly cost-effective, and should be a strong candidate for funding under the NIP.

PMID:
18343537
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.01.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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