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J Heart Lung Transplant. 2008 Mar;27(3):329-34. doi: 10.1016/j.healun.2007.11.576.

Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage pulmonary sarcoidosis: therapeutic effect of sildenafil?

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1
Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the effect of sildenafil treatment in patients with recalcitrant pulmonary sarcoidosis.

METHODS:

This investigation was a single-center, retrospective study of all patients (n = 25) with end-stage pulmonary sarcoidosis referred for lung transplantation. Hemodynamic measurements were evaluated by right-side cardiac catheterization in 24 of 25 patients. Sildenafil treatment for patients with sarcoidosis-associated PH was introduced in April 2004.

RESULTS:

The study group of 24 patients (16 men, 8 women) had a median age of 45 (range 35 to 58) years, and duration of sarcoidosis of 11 (range 2 to 38) years. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) was median 36 (range 18 to 73) mm Hg. PH (MPAP >25 mm Hg) was present in 19 of 24 patients (79%). Sildenafil was administered to 12 of 13 patients at a dose of 150 (range 75 to 225) mg/day for 4 (range 1 to 12) months. Sildenafil treatment was associated with reductions in MPAP of -8 mm Hg (CI -1 to -15 mm Hg), and PVR -4.9 Wood units (CI -7.2 to -2.6 Wood units). Cardiac output and cardiac index also increased during treatment (p = 0.01, respectively). There were no consistent changes in 6-minute walk distance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with severe pulmonary sarcoidosis have a high prevalence of PH. Sildenafil treatment was associated with significant improvements in hemodynamic parameters.

PMID:
18342757
DOI:
10.1016/j.healun.2007.11.576
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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