Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS Med. 2008 Mar 11;5(3):e51. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050051.

Global transcript profiles of fat in monozygotic twins discordant for BMI: pathways behind acquired obesity.

Author information

1
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The acquired component of complex traits is difficult to dissect in humans. Obesity represents such a trait, in which the metabolic and molecular consequences emerge from complex interactions of genes and environment. With the substantial morbidity associated with obesity, a deeper understanding of the concurrent metabolic changes is of considerable importance. The goal of this study was to investigate this important acquired component and expose obesity-induced changes in biological pathways in an identical genetic background.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

We used a special study design of "clonal controls," rare monozygotic twins discordant for obesity identified through a national registry of 2,453 young, healthy twin pairs. A total of 14 pairs were studied (eight male, six female; white), with a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age 25.8 +/- 1.4 y and a body mass index (BMI) difference 5.2 +/- 1.8 kg/m(2). Sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in subcutaneous fat and peripheral leukocytes revealed no aberrant heteroplasmy between the co-twins. However, mtDNA copy number was reduced by 47% in the obese co-twin's fat. In addition, novel pathway analyses of the adipose tissue transcription profiles exposed significant down-regulation of mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism (p < 0.0001). In line with this finding, serum levels of insulin secretion-enhancing BCAAs were increased in obese male co-twins (9% increase, p = 0.025). Lending clinical relevance to the findings, in both sexes the observed aberrations in mitochondrial amino acid metabolism pathways in fat correlated closely with liver fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and hyperinsulinemia, early aberrations of acquired obesity in these healthy young adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings emphasize a substantial role of mitochondrial energy- and amino acid metabolism in obesity and development of insulin resistance.

PMID:
18336063
PMCID:
PMC2265758
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pmed.0050051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center