Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Age Ageing. 2008 May;37(3):265-9. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afn043. Epub 2008 Mar 10.

Incidence, preventability and consequences of adverse events in older people: results of a retrospective case-note review.

Author information

1
Department of Health Economics and Management, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Poursina Ave, Tehran 1417613191, Iran. akbarisari@tums.ac.ir

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

to estimate the extent, preventability and consequences of adverse clinical events in elderly and non-elderly patients.

DESIGN:

a two-stage structured, retrospective, patient case-note review.

SETTING:

a large NHS hospital in England.

POPULATION:

a random sample of 1,006 non-psychiatric patients.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

proportion of patients with adverse events, the proportion of preventable adverse events and the types and consequences of adverse events in patients >or=75 and under 75 years old.

RESULTS:

forty five [13.5%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 10-17] of 332 patients >or=75 years and 42 (6.2%; 95% CI 4-8) of 674 patients <75 years had at least one adverse event. There was a significantly raised risk of experiencing an adverse event with increasing age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.03 adverse events per year of life, P < 0.001]. There was no statistically significant difference in preventability of adverse events and also in experiencing disability or death as a result of an adverse event by age after adjustment for potential confounders.

CONCLUSION:

adverse events are significantly more common in non-psychiatric elderly inpatients than younger patients. There is little evidence that adverse events in older patients are more preventable and lead to disability or death more frequently.

Comment in

PMID:
18332053
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afn043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center