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Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2008;40(8):1452-66. doi: 10.1016/j.biocel.2008.01.009. Epub 2008 Jan 19.

Misincorporation of amino acid analogues into proteins by biosynthesis.

Author information

1
The Cell Biology Group, The Heart Research Institute, 114 Pyrmont Bridge Road, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. rodgersk@hri.org.au

Abstract

Despite astounding diversity in their structure and function, proteins are constructed from 22 protein or 'canonical' amino acids. Hundreds of amino acid analogues exist; many occur naturally in plants, some are synthetically produced or can be produced in vivo by oxidation of amino acid side-chains. Certain structural analogues of the protein amino acids can escape detection by the cellular machinery for protein synthesis and become misincorporated into the growing polypeptide chain of proteins to generate non-native proteins. In this review we seek to provide a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the biosynthetic incorporation of amino acid analogues into proteins by mammalian cells. We highlight factors influencing their incorporation and how the non-native proteins generated can alter cell function. We examine the ability of amino acid analogues, representing those commonly found in damaged proteins in pathological tissues, to be misincorporated into proteins by cells in vitro, providing us with a useful tool in the laboratory to generate modified proteins representing those present in a wide-range of pathologies. We also discuss the evidence for amino acid analogue incorporation in vivo and its association with autoimmune symptoms. We confine the review to studies in which the synthetic machinery of cell has not been modified to accept non-protein amino acids.

PMID:
18329946
DOI:
10.1016/j.biocel.2008.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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