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Metabolism. 2008 Apr;57(4):544-8. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2007.11.018.

Association among cigarette smoking, metabolic syndrome, and its individual components: the metabolic syndrome study in Taiwan.

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1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan.

Abstract

Insulin resistance is a common feature of metabolic syndrome. Smokers are at great risk of developing insulin resistance. Theoretically, smoking status should be associated with metabolic syndrome. This study aimed to explore the association among cigarette smoking, metabolic syndrome, and its individual components. Information of participants regarding previous and current diseases, family history of disease, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, betel nut chewing, and physical activity status were gathered from self-reported nutrition and lifestyle questionnaires. The fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level, blood pressure, and anthropometric indices in each patient were measured. Data of 1146 male subjects were analyzed. Individuals who currently smoked had a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than those who had never smoked and those who had quit smoking. The adjusted odds ratios of current smoking amount showed a statistically significant dose-dependent association with metabolic syndrome, high triglyceride level, and low HDL-C level. Current smokers who smoke > or =20 pack-years have a significantly increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, high triglyceride level, and low HDL-C level. The higher risk of development of metabolic syndrome, high triglyceride level, and low HDL-C level was insignificant in former smokers. In conclusion, this community-based study supports the view that smoking is associated with metabolic syndrome and its individual components. Smoking cessation is beneficial to metabolic syndrome and its individual components.

PMID:
18328358
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2007.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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