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Anaesth Intensive Care. 2008 Jan;36(1):84-9.

The pulmonary artery catheter in Australasia: a survey investigating intensive care physicians' knowledge and perception of future trends in use.

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1
Intensive Care UnitS, Gold Coast Hospital, Gold Coast, Australia.

Abstract

A survey was conducted to assess the knowledge and trends of use of the pulmonary artery catheter amongst intensive care practitioners in Australasia. A 31-item multiple choice questionnaire, identical to one previously trialled in studies in the United States and Europe, was distributed to all registered intensive care specialists and trainees working in intensive care units in Australasia. Five-hundred-and-forty-one questionnaires were distributed and 151 (27.9%) were returned, with an average mark of 82.7% +/- 9.3% and a range of 53.3 to 100%. Total score was significantly associated with years of experience in intensive care (P < 0.04), number of pulmonary artery catheters inserted (P < 0.015) and whether or not the respondent had passed the Joint Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine examination (P < 0.01). Scores were significantly higher amongst trainees (P < 0.0001) and physicians who had passed the Joint Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine examination (P < 0.0001). Overall, 44.9% of respondents indicated their use of the pulmonary artery catheter was decreasing, with 42.6% indicating their use was the same over the past five years. Sixty-one percent of respondents indicated they either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that the use of echocardiography should supersede the use of the pulmonary artery catheter by intensive care specialists in the future. We concluded that in this study, knowledge of the pulmonary artery catheter and its use is better in Australasia than in previous studies in North America and Europe. The majority of respondents in Australasia believe that echocardiography will supersede the use of the pulmonary artery catheter in the future.

PMID:
18326138
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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