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Cancer Causes Control. 2008 Sep;19(7):711-23. doi: 10.1007/s10552-008-9134-9. Epub 2008 Mar 6.

Gender- and race-specific comparison of tobacco-associated cancer incidence trends in Florida with SEER regional cancer incidence data.

Author information

1
Florida Cancer Data System, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. dlee@med.miami.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Analysis of state and national tobacco-associated cancer trends is critical for the identification of high-risk regions of the country that require the attention of the public health community. This study compares Florida race- and gender-specific cancer trends with pooled data obtained from nine Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER-9) registries.

METHODS:

Age-adjusted, race- and gender-specific cancer incidence trends were evaluated using joinpoint regression analysis. Pooled, age-adjusted incidence rates and standardized incidence rate ratios were computed for each cancer for the years 1999-2003 to compare Florida to SEER-9.

RESULTS:

Relative to SEER-9 whites and irrespective of gender, lung cancer rates in white Floridians were elevated through the 1990s. However, lung cancer rates have recently declined at a steeper rate among white Floridians than among SEER-9 whites. For years 1999-2003, black Floridians had significantly lower rates of lung, bladder, pancreas, and kidney cancer relative to SEER-9 blacks. The opposite pattern was evident for white Floridians with significantly higher rates of lung and laryngeal cancer relative to SEER-9 whites.

CONCLUSION:

Progress in the reduction of tobacco-associated cancers among white Floridians lags behind the progress noted in SEER-9 registries suggesting that additional state-directed smoking prevention and smoking cessation measures are needed.

PMID:
18322816
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-008-9134-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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