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J Am Coll Health. 2008 Jan-Feb;56(4):409-14. doi: 10.3200/JACH.56.44.409-414.

Depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE AND PARTICIPANTS:

The authors examined (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample and (2) the role of smoking self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to abstain from smoking) in explaining the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking.

METHODS:

Predominantly first-year college students at a large public university completed a self-report inventory indexing depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, and smoking self-efficacy.

RESULTS:

Findings indicated that students high in depressive symptoms smoked significantly more cigarettes per day than did those with low depressive symptoms. Further, among current smokers, smoking self-efficacy explained the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings add to accumulating evidence that depressive symptoms are a risk factor for increased cigarette smoking in college students. The authors discuss implications for university-based smoking cessation and prevention programs.

PMID:
18316285
DOI:
10.3200/JACH.56.44.409-414
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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