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J Foot Ankle Surg. 2008 Mar-Apr;47(2):89-95. doi: 10.1053/j.jfas.2007.10.015. Epub 2008 Jan 16.

Foot medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait in subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome.

Author information

1
Gait Analysis Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Physical Therapy, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen, Demark. Thomas.Bandholm@hvh.regionh.dk

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate (1) if subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome demonstrate increased navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait compared with healthy subjects, and (2) the relationship between medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait. Thirty subjects aged 20 to 32 years were included (15 with medial tibial stress syndrome and 15 controls). Navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation were measured during quiet standing with neutral and loaded foot using a ruler and digital photography. Medial longitudinal-arch deformation was measured during walking gait using 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome demonstrated a significantly larger navicular drop (mean +/- 1 SD, 7.7 +/- 3.1 mm) and medial longitudinal-arch deformation (5.9 +/- 3.2 degrees) during quiet standing compared with controls (5.0 +/- 2.2 mm and 3.5 +/- 2.6 degrees, P < .05). Subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome also demonstrated significantly larger medial longitudinal-arch deformation (8.8 +/- 1.8 degrees) during gait compared with controls (7.1 +/- 1.7 degrees, P = .015). There was no correlation between medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait in either of the 2 groups (r < 0.127, P > .653). The subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome in this study demonstrated increased navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and increased medial longitudinal-arch deformation during gait compared to healthy subjects. Medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing did not correlate with medial longitudinal-arch deformation during gait in either of the 2 groups. ACFAS Level of Clinical Evidence: 5.

PMID:
18312915
DOI:
10.1053/j.jfas.2007.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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