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Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2042-50. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2006.106443. Epub 2008 Feb 28.

HIV and sexually transmitted infection risk behaviors and beliefs among Black West Indian immigrants and US-born Blacks.

Author information

1
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. sh51@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We compared Black West Indian immigrants' and US-born Blacks' sexual and drug-use risk behaviors and their beliefs related to using condoms and informing partners of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to identify possible differences in risk.

METHODS:

We drew data from the baseline assessment of a clinic-based intervention designed to increase partner STI notification.

RESULTS:

Black West Indian men were less likely than were US-born Black men to report nonregular partners. There were no differences in condom use. US-born Black women were more likely than were Black West Indian women to be extremely confident that they could convince their regular partners to use condoms (odds ratio [OR] = 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 4.76), whereas there were no differences between Black West Indian and US-born Black men on this measure (interaction P = .06). US-born Black women were more likely than were Black West Indian women to be extremely confident in their ability to discuss STI screening with their regular partners (OR = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.03, 3.47).

CONCLUSIONS:

Black West Indian women's lower levels of confidence that they can discuss STI screening with their regular partners and convince these partners to use condoms may increase their infection risk. Gender-sensitive interventions are warranted for Black West Indian immigrants, especially women.

PMID:
18309140
PMCID:
PMC2636422
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2006.106443
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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