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Dig Liver Dis. 2008 May;40(5):348-54. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2007.12.017. Epub 2008 Mar 4.

Differences in oesophageal bolus transit between patients with and without erosive reflux disease.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi Hospital and University School of Medicine, Hualien 97004, Taiwan. harry.clchen@msa.hinet.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We determined any difference in oesophageal function between reflux patients with and without erosive esophagitis by the application of concurrent manometry and impedance.

METHODS:

Twenty patients with erosive esophagitis, 20 patients with non-erosive reflux disease, and 15 controls were included in this study. All subjects underwent studies with a catheter containing four impedance-measuring segments and five solid-state pressure transducers. Each subject received 10 liquid and 10 viscous boluses to be swallowed.

RESULTS:

Healthy controls had greater distal oesophageal peristaltic amplitude than both patient groups (p < 0.05). Normal oesophageal peristalsis was found more frequently in healthy controls than either of the patient groups (p < 0.05). Patients with erosive esophagitis exhibited a lower percentage of complete bolus transit compared to healthy controls and non-erosive reflux disease patients (both p < 0.05). Patients with erosive esophagitis had a longer total bolus transit time compared to healthy controls and non-erosive reflux disease patients (both p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Erosive esophagitis is characterized by longer oesophageal bolus transit and fewer complete bolus transit than non-erosive reflux disease. The noted differences in oesophageal bolus transit may reflect a continuum of dysfunction secondary to increasing oesophageal mucosal damage.

PMID:
18291736
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2007.12.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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