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Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2008 May 15;32(4):994-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2008.01.012. Epub 2008 Jan 26.

Involvement of the adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of zinc in the forced swimming test.

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1
Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário - Trindade - 88040-900, Florianópolis-SC, Brazil.

Abstract

It was previously shown that the acute administration of zinc chloride elicits an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test (FST). We have also shown that the activation of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors produces an antidepressant-like effect in FST. Thus, this study investigated the involvement of adenosine receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of zinc in the FST. The antidepressant-like effect of ZnCl(2) (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was prevented by the pretreatment of animals with caffeine (3 mg/kg, i.p., a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist), DPCPX (2 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist) or ZM241385 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist), administered at doses that per se produced no anti-immobility effect. Moreover, the treatment of mice with CHA (0.05 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist), DPMA (0.1 mg/kg, i.p., a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) or dipyridamole (0.1 microg/site, i.c.v., an adenosine transporter inhibitor) was able to potentiate the action of sub-effective doses of ZnCl(2). Taken together, the results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of zinc in the mouse FST might involve a direct or indirect activation of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors.

PMID:
18289757
DOI:
10.1016/j.pnpbp.2008.01.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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