Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Ophthalmol. 2008 Mar;145(3):487-492. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2007.11.010.

Retrospective review of methotrexate therapy in the treatment of chronic, noninfectious, nonnecrotizing scleritis.

Author information

1
Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, New Jersey Medical School-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the effectiveness and steroid-sparing capabilities of methotrexate in the treatment of chronic, noninfectious, nonnecrotizing scleritis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients treated for scleritis between January 1, 2000 and July 31, 2005 at the Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at New Jersey Medical School of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Outcome measures included inflammation, corticosteroid and methotrexate dosages, visual acuity, and reported side effects.

RESULTS:

Eighteen patients, with a total of 27 affected eyes, were included in the study: 15 women and three men with a mean age of 52 years. Inflammation control was achieved in 11 patients, nine women and two men. Successful corticosteroid sparing was achieved in 10 of the 11 patients, with three patients completely discontinuing corticosteroid use. Visual acuity was maintained or improved in 21 (78%) of 27 affected eyes. Eight patients reported adverse effects, with one patient discontinuing treatment because of unbearable fatigue. The dose of methotrexate ranged from 7.5 to 35 mg weekly. The mean duration of methotrexate therapy was 19 months (standard deviation, 11 months). There were no serious adverse reactions or long-term morbidity caused by methotrexate therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Methotrexate seems to be a well-tolerated therapy that can reduce inflammation successfully and can decrease the corticosteroid requirement in the treatment of chronic, noninfectious, and nonnecrotizing scleritis.

PMID:
18282493
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2007.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center