Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Ophthalmol. 2008 Mar;145(3):472-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2007.11.009.

Human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated uveitis: long-term follow-up and gender differences.

Author information

1
FC Donders Institute of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.braakenburg@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate clinical features and gender differences in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-associated acute anterior uveitis (AAU) in long-term follow-up.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

METHODS:

The clinical records of 177 HLA-B27-positive patients (96 males [54%] and 81 females [46%]) who sought treatment for acute anterior uveitis (AAU) at the University Medical Center Utrecht between January 1995 and December 2005 were evaluated. All patients had a minimum follow-up of at least one year. The clinical data were analyzed at standardized intervals (one, five, and 10 years after the onset of uveitis).

RESULTS:

Average age at onset of AAU was 36 years, with no differences between males and females. HLA-B27-associated systemic disease developed earlier in males than in females (31 vs 37 years; P=.021). Consequently, at onset of AAU, HLA-B27-associated systemic disease were more frequent in males than in females (25/75 [33%] males vs nine/54 [17%] females; P=.030); however over time, males and females were at equal risk of developing a HLA-B27-associated systemic disease. Bilateral uveitis developed more frequently in females (6/45 [13%] of males vs 11/35, [31%] of females; P=.05). In none of the patients did bilateral visual acuity of less than 0.5 develop after the follow-up of 10 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

The long-term visual prognosis of HLA-B27-associated AAU was favorable, despite the frequent attacks of severe AAU. At the onset of AAU, the prevalence of HLA-B27-associated systemic disease was more frequent in males, but after the onset of uveitis, the risk of developing a HLA-B27-associated systemic disease is similar for both males and females.

PMID:
18282492
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2007.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center