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Epilepsy Res. 2008 Mar;79(1):63-70. doi: 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2007.12.011. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

Epilepsy and electroencephalographic anomalies in chromosome 2 aberrations. A review.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Section, University of Siena, Italy. grosso@unisi.it

Abstract

Epilepsy and electroencephalographic (EEG) anomalies are common in subjects carrying chromosomal aberrations. We report clinical and EEG investigations on 13 patients carrying chromosome 2 anomalies, including two patients with inversions, six with translocations, two with partial duplications and three with interstitial deletion syndromes. Epilepsy and/or EEG anomalies were found in one patient with a chromosome 2 translocation, in both of those carrying partial duplications and in all three with interstitial deletion syndromes. No epilepsy or EEG anomalies were detected in the remaining patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Epilepsy may be associated with chromosome 2 aberrations. Gross rearrangements involving the long arm of chromosome 2 might be more often associated with epilepsy than those involving the short arm. The association of epilepsy with chromosome 2 duplications is less clear. In particular, our observations and a review of the literature appear to suggest that a strict relationship between epilepsy and interstitial deletions involving the 2q24-q31 region. In the latter disorder tonic and focal seizures occur early in life. Generalized and focal myoclonic jerks tend to appear in infancy and are subsequently followed by seizures mixed in type. Seizures usually persist up to late childhood and are drug resistant. Further studies are necessary to better define the electroclinical patterns of patients carrying deletions in 2q24-q31. These may help to direct systematic study of this--probably underestimated--cause of severe epilepsy.

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