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Am J Ophthalmol. 2008 Oct;146(4):579-88. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2007.12.021. Epub 2008 Feb 15.

Multifocal electroretinography in HIV-positive patients without infectious retinitis.

Author information

1
Joan and Irwin Jacobs Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Shiley Eye Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate early changes in the central retinal response in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients without infectious retinitis using multifocal electroretinography (mfERG).

DESIGN:

Case control study.

METHODS:

We evaluated three cohorts: HIV-negative controls and two groups of HIV-positive patients separated according to their nadir CD4 counts (>or= 100 cells/mm(3) and < 100 cells/mm(3) for a minimum of six months). mfERG first-order kernels (FOKs) and second-order kernels (SOKs) were analyzed separately by areas of rings, quadrants, and individual hexagons for each cohort.

RESULTS:

Of 103 hexagon locations of FOK results, there were no significant differences in amplitudes of P1 and N1 across the groups (.05 < P < .50), although there was a trend for an overall reduction in the amplitudes. Similarly, latency N1 did not differ (.28 < P < .95). There were significantly delayed latencies of P1 between cohorts across 103 hexagons in both kernels. SOK results also showed significant delay in latencies of P1 and a trend of reduced P1 amplitudes across studied locations among cohorts (.24 < P < .08).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results demonstrate widespread delay in latency in HIV-positive patients, especially in those with prolonged low (below 100 cells/mm(3)) CD4 nadir counts. These findings suggest early diffuse dysfunction of the inner retina results from severe HIV disease even in the HAART era.

PMID:
18280451
PMCID:
PMC2614872
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2007.12.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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