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J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 May-Jun;42(5):466-71. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0b013e31803104d4.

Effectiveness and safety of capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases.

Author information

1
Galician Agency for Health Technology Assessment, Galician Health Authority, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Abstract

GOALS:

To assess the effectiveness, safety, and clinical use of capsule endoscopy (CE) in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases.

STUDY:

Systematic review carried out in the main electronic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COCHRANE. Papers were selected independently by the 2 researchers and the quality was determined using a purpose-designed scale.

RESULTS:

A total of 9 systematic reviews and 28 original papers were included [11 assessed obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, 9 Crohn's disease (CD), and 4 hereditary polyposis syndromes]. The diagnostic yield of CE for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding ranged from 39% to 77%. The diagnostic yield of push enteroscopy was lower than 40% in all but 1 study. CE detected suggestive findings in 19% to 71% of patients with suspected CD, whereas radiologic techniques did so in only 0% to 37% of the cases. In patients with suspected recurrence, detection with these techniques was 58% to 81% and 19% to 67%, respectively. Endoscopic capsule detected a greater number of polyps in patients with polyposis syndromes but other techniques allowed for better localization.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although CE occupies a preferential place in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding and CD; there is insufficient evidence to establish whether it could be used as a first line diagnostic test. The evidence is insufficient to ascertain this technique's usefulness in small bowel disorders other than obscure bleeding or CD.

PMID:
18277887
DOI:
10.1097/MCG.0b013e31803104d4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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