Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Infect Dis. 2008 Feb 15;197(4):519-26. doi: 10.1086/526787.

Antibodies to pre-erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum antigens and risk of clinical malaria in Kenyan children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. ccj@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

IgG antibodies to pre-erythrocytic antigens are involved in prevention of infection and disease in animal models of malaria but have not been associated with protection against disease in human malaria.

METHODS:

Levels of IgG antibodies to circumsporozoite protein (CSP), liver-stage antigen type 1 (LSA-1), and thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) were measured in 86 children in a malaria-holoendemic area of Kenya. The children were then monitored for episodes of clinical malaria for 52 weeks.

RESULTS:

Children with high levels of IgG antibodies to CSP, LSA-1, and TRAP had a decreased risk of clinical malaria (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.81; P = .02), a lower incidence of clinical malaria (P=.006), protection from clinical malaria with a parasite level of > or =4000 parasites/microL (P= .03), and a higher hemoglobin level at enrollment (P= .009), compared with children with lower antibody levels. Protection against malaria morbidity was associated primarily with antibodies to CSP and LSA-1.

CONCLUSIONS:

Kenyan children with high levels of IgG antibodies to the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, LSA-1, and TRAP have a lower risk of developing clinical malaria than children without high levels of these antibodies. The decreased risk of clinical malaria may be mediated in part by prevention of high-density parasitemia.

PMID:
18275273
PMCID:
PMC2607240
DOI:
10.1086/526787
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center