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Sleep. 2008 Feb;31(2):219-23.

Epidemiology of restless legs syndrome in Korean adults.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea. neurocho@dsmc.or.kr

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in Korea.

DESIGN:

A large population-based telephone interview method using the Korean version of the Johns Hopkins telephone diagnostic interview for the RLS.

SETTING:

A computer aided telephone interview method.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 5,000 subjects (2,470 men and 2,530 women) were interviewed in depth. A representative sample aged 20 to 69 years was constituted according to a stratified, multistage random sampling method.

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Of the respondents, 373 respondents (7.5%) of the population (pop) met the criteria for the definite or probable RLS groups: 194 (3.9% of pop) respondents fulfilled the criteria for definite RLS and 179 (3.6% of pop) respondents fulfilled the criteria for probable RLS. The prevalence of RLS was generally higher for women than men (4.4% vs. 3.3% for definite, 8.7% vs. 6.2% for definite plus probable). About 90% of RLS individuals were experiencing symptoms at the time of the interview and this was similar for both RLS groups. Seventy-four respondents (1.48%) reported symptoms were moderately or severely distressing and were therefore classified as RLS "sufferers." Of those with a diagnosis of RLS sufferer, 24.3% reported being treated for their symptoms, compared to 12.4% of RLS not designated a "sufferer."

CONCLUSION:

RLS is common and underdiagnosed in Korea with nearly 1% of the population reporting disturbed sleep related to their RLS. These results are comparable to other countries.

PMID:
18274269
PMCID:
PMC2225579
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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