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J Vasc Surg. 1991 Apr;13(4):480-6.

Eicosapentanoic acid suppresses intimal hyperplasia after expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafting in rabbits fed a high cholesterol diet.

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1
First Department of Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Japan.

Abstract

The effect of purified eicosapentanoic acid on intimal fibrous hyperplasia in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafts was examined in 18 rabbits undergoing infrarenal aorta reconstruction. Six rabbits received commercial rabbit chow (control group), six a regular diet supplemented with 1% cholesterol (cholesterol group), and six the cholesterol diet with 91.1% pure eicosapentanoic acid 500 mg/day (eicosapentanoic acid group). Grafts were harvested 3 months after surgery for histologic examination. The platelet count and serum beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 concentrations were not significantly different between groups. Serum arachidonic acid level in the cholesterol group was significantly higher than in the control group, and serum eicosapentanoic acid levels in the eicosapentanoic acid group were significantly higher than in the remaining two groups. Intergroup differences in serum 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2 concentrations were not significant. Intimal thickness at midgraft was 5.2 +/- 6.2 microns in the control group, 67.6 +/- 46.9 microns in the cholesterol group, and 19.2 +/- 18.4 microns in the eicosapntanoic acid group. intimal thickness in the cholesterol group was greater than in either the control or licosapentanoic acid group (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that eicosapentanoic acid reduces intimal fibrous proliferation in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene grafting as a result of hypercholesterolemia and that this effect is independent of the platelet count, activated platelet factors, and the prostacyclin/thromboxane A2 ratio.

PMID:
1826332
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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