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Genomics. 2008 Apr;91(4):347-55. doi: 10.1016/j.ygeno.2007.12.007. Epub 2008 Feb 5.

A protein-protein interaction network of transcription factors acting during liver cell proliferation.

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1
Shanghai Municipality Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

Liver regeneration is a complex process that involves a multitude of cellular functions, including primarily cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and metabolism. A number of signaling pathways that control these processes have been identified, and cross communication between them by direct protein-protein interactions has been shown to be crucial in orchestrating liver regeneration. Previously, we have identified a group of transcription factors capable of regulating liver cell growth and that may be involved in liver cancer development. The expression of some of their mouse counterpart genes was altered dramatically after liver injury and regeneration induced by CCl(4) in mice. In an effort to elucidate the molecular basis for liver regeneration through protein-protein interactions (PPI), a matrix mating Y2H approach was produced to generate a PPI network between a set of 32 regulatory proteins. Sixty-four interactions were identified, including 4 that had been identified previously. Ten of the interactions were further confirmed with GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Information provided by this PPI network may shed further light on the molecular mechanisms that regulate liver regeneration at the protein interaction level and ultimately identify regulatory factors that may serve as candidate drug targets for the treatment of liver diseases.

PMID:
18255255
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygeno.2007.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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