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Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi. 2007 Sep;29(9):693-6.

[Primary diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the small intestine: clinicopathologic features, management, and prognosis in 24 patients].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Tongji Hospital, Medical School of Shanghai Tongji University, Shanghai 200065, China. chenchunqiu6@126.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the clinicopathological features of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) of the small intestine, CD10 expression, and their relationship to prognosis.

METHODS:

Twenty-four cases of small intestinal DLBCLs were studied clinically and pathologically. All cases were staged according to the Ann Arbor classification of lymphoma.

RESULTS:

Fifteen cases (62.5%) were at stages I and II, and nine cases (37.5%) at stages III and IV. The Karnofsky performance status ranged from 40% to 100% (mean 75.5%). Twenty cases (83.3%) received surgical resection, sixteen cases (66.7%) received chemotherapy, and no patient received radiotherapy. Seven of 19 cases (36.8%) were CD10+. Although there was no statistically significant difference(P = 0.28) in therapy result between the CD10+ and CDO1--groups, patients with CD10+ lymphoma more frequently presented with stages I compared with those with CD10 - lymphoma (P = 0.013). Follow-up information was available in 19 cases ranging from 1 to 111 months (mean 32.7 months). Five cases died of the disease. The mortality rate was 26.3%. The analysis of survival rate showed a longer overall survival duration in the stage I and II group compared with that of the stage III and IV group ( P = 0.0197 ) , but there was no significant difference between CD10+ and CD1- groups.

CONCLUSION:

The primary small intestnal diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients at stage I and II respond better to therapy including surgical resection and chemotherapy than those at stage III and IV. CD10+ expression is more common in stage I lymphomas.

PMID:
18246801
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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