Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatr Serv. 2008 Feb;59(2):201-4. doi: 10.1176/ps.2008.59.2.201.

How does violence potential relate to crisis intervention team responses to emergencies?

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, School of Social Ecology, 3311 Social Ecology II, Irvine CA 92697-7085, USA. skeem@uci.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study explored whether a crisis intervention team (CIT) promotes public safety and diversion from jail to treatment.

METHODS:

Police reports (N=655) were analyzed for CIT events that occurred between March 2003 and May 2005 to determine each subject's potential for violence to self or others.

RESULTS:

Some 45% of CIT events involved suicide crises, 26% involved a threat to others, and average violence potential ratings suggested minor to moderate risk. Officers' use of force related strongly to violence potential (eta of .54). Nevertheless, officers used force in only 15% of 189 events posing serious to extreme risk of violence and used low-lethality methods. Of events, 74% were resolved through hospitalization, whereas only 4% were resolved through arrest.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the study lacked a comparison group, the results are consistent with some studies suggesting that CIT holds promise in meeting safety and jail diversion goals.

PMID:
18245166
DOI:
10.1176/ps.2008.59.2.201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center