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J Feline Med Surg. 2008 Jul;10(3):247-51. doi: 10.1016/j.jfms.2007.12.001. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

Comparison of different in-house test systems to detect parvovirus in faeces of cats.

Author information

1
Medizinische Kleintierklinik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany. Felix.neuerer@med.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

In-house tests for the identification of faecal parvovirus antigen are now available. The majority of these are licensed for canine parvovirus only; but anecdotal information suggests that they will detect feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) as well. This prospective study was designed to compare five commercially available test systems. In total, 200 faecal samples from randomly selected healthy cats (148) and cats with diarrhoea (52) were tested and compared with the results of examination by electron microscopy. Ten cats were positive for FPV and all of these had diarrhoea. In-house canine parvovirus tests can be used to detect FPV. All tests were suitable to screen cats for faecal parvovirus excretion (positive predictive values for the Witness Parvo, the Snap Parvo, the SAS Parvo, the Fastest Parvo Strip, and the Speed Parvo were 100.0, 100.0, 57.1, 38.9, and 100%, respectively, negative predictive values for the Witness Parvo, the Snap Parvo, the SAS Parvo, the Fastest Parvo Strip, and the Speed Parvo were 97.4, 97.9, 98.9, 98.4, and 97.4%, respectively). In-house parvovirus tests may be positive up to 2 weeks after vaccination, and therefore, in recently vaccinated cats positive results do not necessarily mean infection.

PMID:
18243743
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfms.2007.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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