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Fertil Steril. 2009 Jan;91(1):201-6. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.11.025. Epub 2008 Feb 20.

Adenomyosis a variant, not a disease? Evidence from hysterectomized menopausal women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA. weissge@umdnj.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our study evaluates the symptoms commonly attributed to adenomyosis in women undergoing the menopausal transition. We hypothesized that adenomyosis is more commonly seen in women with fibroids, pelvic pain, abnormal uterine bleeding, and in the presence of endometriosis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort.

SETTING:

Multisite community-based study.

PATIENT(S):

Enrollees in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation who had hysterectomies.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Relationship of adenomyosis to presenting symptoms and other patient characteristics.

RESULT(S):

Adenomyosis was found in 48% of 137 patients. Frequencies of presenting symptoms were similar in those with and without evidence of adenomyosis. The same prevalence of fibroids was seen in the presence or absence of adenomyosis: 37% versus 43%, endometriosis, 3% versus 5%, abnormal bleeding, 27% versus 33%, or chronic pelvic pain in the presence of fibroids 12% versus 17%.

CONCLUSION(S):

Adenomyosis is a common diagnosis seen in hysterectomized specimens from women undergoing the perimenopausal transition. Adenomyosis is equally common in women who also have fibroids, endometriosis, pelvic pain, or abnormal uterine bleeding, and women who do not. Therefore, adenomyosis is an incidental finding, not the source of the symptomatology. It appears not to be a "disease" per se but rather a normal variant.

PMID:
18243177
PMCID:
PMC2680233
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.11.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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