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Respir Med. 2008 May;102(5):733-7. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2007.12.010. Epub 2008 Jan 31.

Effect of meteorological variables on the incidence of respiratory tract infections.

Author information

1
Alfa Institute of Biomedical Sciences (AIBS), Athens, Greece. m.falagas@aibs.gr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The possible effect of the various meteorological variables on the incidence of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs) has intrigued the scientific community for decades.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective analysis regarding the association between meteorological variables and clinical data for upper and lower RTIs in the area of Attica, Greece.

RESULTS:

There was a statistically significant (P<0.001) negative correlation between weekly average temperature with the proportion of weekly house call visits resulting in a diagnosis of upper or lower RTIs 4 days later (R=-0.56 and -0.71 for upper and lower RTIs, respectively) as well as 7 days later (R=-0.57 and -0.71 for upper and lower RTIs, respectively) and during the same day (R=-0.55 and -0.68 for upper and lower RTIs, respectively). In addition, there was a negative correlation between weekly wind chill average (and minimum) temperature as well as a positive correlation of relative humidity with upper and lower RTIs. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between wind speed and upper or lower RTIs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest that house call visits due to upper and lower RTIs increased as the average temperature in the area of Attica decreased.

PMID:
18242070
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2007.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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