Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Physiol. 2008 Mar 15;586(6):1637-47. doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2007.149732. Epub 2008 Jan 31.

Pre- and postsynaptic plasticity underlying augmented glutamatergic inputs to hypothalamic presympathetic neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Abstract

Increased sympathetic outflow plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Glutamatergic inputs in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus maintain resting sympathetic vasomotor tone in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In this study, we determined the synaptic and cellular mechanisms of increased glutamatergic inputs to PVN presympathetic neurons in SHR. The spinally projecting PVN neurons were retrogradely labelled by fluorescent microspheres injected into the intermediolateral cell column of the spinal cord. Blockade of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors significantly decreased the firing activity of labelled PVN neurons in brain slices in SHR, but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). The basal frequency of glutamatergic spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs, respectively) of labelled PVN neurons was significantly greater in SHR than in WKY. But the frequency of neither sEPSCs nor mEPSCs stimulated by 4-aminopyridine or capsaicin differed significantly between WKY and SHR. Furthermore, the amplitude of postsynaptic NMDA currents elicited by either electrical stimulation or puff application in labelled PVN neurons was significantly higher in SHRs than in WKY. However, the evoked AMPA current amplitude in PVN neurons was similar in WKY and SHR. This study provides new evidence of how the glutamatergic synaptic inputs to PVN presympathetic neurons are increased and how they contribute to the elevated firing activity of these neurons in SHR. The augmented glutamatergic tone in the PVN is maintained by an increase in presynaptic glutamate release and an up-regulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptor function in SHR.

PMID:
18238817
PMCID:
PMC2375700
DOI:
10.1113/jphysiol.2007.149732
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center