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Brain Lang. 2008 Apr;105(1):1-17. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2007.11.007. Epub 2008 Jan 30.

Phoneme-based rehabilitation of anomia in aphasia.

Author information

1
VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall DVA Medical Center University of Florida, Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608-1197, USA. dkendall@ufl.edu

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of phonologic treatment for anomia in aphasia. We proposed that if treatment were directed at the level of the phonologic processor, opportunities for naming via a phonological route, as opposed to a strictly whole word route, would be enhanced, thereby improving naming. The participants, ten people with anomia and aphasia due to left hemisphere stroke, received 96 h of phoneme based treatment in 12 weeks. To learn if treatment improved naming, a single-subject, repeated probe design with replication was employed. The primary outcome measure was confrontation naming. Secondary outcome measures included phonologic production, nonword repetition and discourse production. Results suggest a positive treatment effect (confrontation naming), improvements in phonologic production and nonword repetition, and generalization to discourse production. When tested 3 months after the completion of treatment the effects appeared to be maintained.

PMID:
18237773
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandl.2007.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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