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Osteoporos Int. 2008 Aug;19(8):1203-10. doi: 10.1007/s00198-008-0561-y. Epub 2008 Jan 31.

Association between functional capacity tests and fractures: an eight-year prospective population-based cohort study.

Author information

1
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, Mediteknia Building, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. Matti.Karkkainen@uku.fi

Abstract

This study of postmenopausal women (n=2,928) with an eight-year follow-up revealed that impairment in functional status associated with the increased fracture risk. The standing-on-one-foot and grip strength tests and a question about self-assessed ability to move can be used to identify women with a high risk of suffering a fracture.

INTRODUCTION:

Poor functional status has pointed to associate with injurious falls and consequent fractures. Our aim was to define association between functional capacity and fractures.

METHODS:

This study was based on the Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE). A total of 2,928 postmenopausal women took part in the functional capacity and muscle strength tests. The duration of fracture follow-up varied from 6.43 to 9.86 (mean 8.37) years and the first fracture was the end-point event for the statistical analyses. All analyses were done with Cox-regression.

RESULTS:

A total of 261 end-point fractures occurred. In multivariate analysis the inability to stand-on-one-foot for 10 seconds increased the risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio with 95% CI) 9.11-fold (1.98-42.00). Decreased grip strength associated with 1.05-fold (1.01-1.09) increased risk of hip fractures. Low leg extension strength associated with 1.02-fold (1.00-1.03) higher risk for all fractures. The self-assessed ability to walk less than 100 meters at baseline increased the risk of ankle 2.36-fold (1.10-5.08), hip 11.57-fold (2.73-49.15) and clinical vertebral fractures 3.85-fold (1.45-10.22).

CONCLUSION:

According to these results the standing-on-one-foot less than 10 seconds, grip strength and a question about ability to walk less than 100 meters may help to predict postmenopausal fractures.

PMID:
18236100
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-008-0561-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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