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BMC Infect Dis. 2008 Jan 30;8:12. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-8-12.

Acute bacterial prostatitis: heterogeneity in diagnostic criteria and management. Retrospective multicentric analysis of 371 patients diagnosed with acute prostatitis.

Author information

1
Infectious and Tropical Diseases department, and Groupe de Recherche sur les Antimicrobiens (GRAM-EA2656), Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, F-76031, France. manuel.etienne@chu-rouen.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is currently a lack of consensus for the diagnosis, investigations and treatments of acute bacterial prostatitis (AP).

METHODS:

The symptoms, investigations and treatments of 371 inpatients diagnosed with AP were analyzed through a retrospective study conducted in four departments - Urology (U), Infectious Diseases (ID), Internal Medicine (IM), Geriatrics (G) - of two French university hospitals.

RESULTS:

The cause of admission, symptoms, investigations and treatments depended markedly on the department of admission but not on the hospital. In U, patients commonly presented with a bladder outlet obstruction, they had a large imaging and functional check-up, and received alpha-blockers and anti-inflammatory drugs. In ID, patients were febrile and received longer and more appropriate antibiotic treatments. In G, patients presented with cognitive disorders and commonly had post-void urine volume measurements. In IM, patients presented with a wide range of symptoms, and had very diverse investigations and antibiotic regimen.Overall, a 3:1 ratio of community-acquired AP (CA-AP) to nosocomial AP (N-AP) was observed. Urine culture isolated mainly E. coli (58% of AP, 68% of CA-AP), with venereal agents constituting less than 1%. The probabilistic antibiotic treatments were similar for N-AP and CA-AP (58% bi-therapy; 63% fluoroquinolone-based regimen). For N-AP, these treatments were more likely to be inadequate (42% vs. 8%, p < 0.001) and had a higher rate of bacteriological failure (48% vs. 19%, p < 0.001). Clinical failure at follow-up was more common than bacteriological failure (75% versus 24%, p < 0.001). Patients older than 49 had more underlying urinary tract disorders and a higher rate of clinical failure (30% versus 10%, p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

This study highlights the difficulties encountered on a daily basis by the physicians regarding the diagnosis and management of acute prostatitis.

PMID:
18234108
PMCID:
PMC2254416
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2334-8-12
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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