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J Dairy Res. 2008 May;75(2):129-34. doi: 10.1017/S0022029907002919. Epub 2008 Jan 29.

Identification of 14 new single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine SLC27A1 gene and evaluation of their association with milk fat content.

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1
Laboratorio de Genética Bioquímica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain. lordovas@unizar.es

Abstract

The solute carrier family 27 member 1 (SLC27A1) is an integral membrane protein involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the plasma membrane. This protein has been implicated in diet-induced obesity and is thought to be important in the control of energy homeostasis. In previous reports, our group described the isolation and characterization of the bovine SLC27A1 gene. The bovine gene is organized in 13 exons spanning over more than 40 kb of genomic DNA and maps in BTA 7 where several quantitative trait loci for fat related traits have been described. Because of its key role in lipid metabolism and its genomic localization, in the present work the search for variability in the bovine SLC27A1 gene was carried out with the aim of evaluating its potential association with milk fat content in dairy cattle. By sequencing analysis of all exons and flanking regions 14 new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified: 1 in the promoter, 7 in introns and 6 in exons. Allele frequencies of all the SNPs were calculated by minisequencing analysis in two groups of Holstein-Friesian animals with highest and lowest milk-fat content estimated breeding values as well as in animals of two Spanish cattle breeds, Asturiana de los Valles and Menorquina. In the conditions assayed, no significant differences between Holstein-Friesian groups were found for any of the SNPs, suggesting that the SLC27A1 gene may have a poor or null effect on milk fat content. In Asturiana and Menorquina breeds all the positions were polymorphic with the exception of SNPs 1 and 8 in which C allele was fixed in both of them.

PMID:
18226296
DOI:
10.1017/S0022029907002919
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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