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Am J Ophthalmol. 2008 Feb;145(2):239-248. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2007.10.004.

Randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: PIER Study year 1.

Author information

1
Retina Service, Wills Eye Institute, 840 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. cregillo@aol.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ranibizumab administered monthly for three months and then quarterly in patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

DESIGN:

Phase IIIb, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, sham injection-controlled trial in patients with predominantly or minimally classic or occult with no classic CNV lesions.

METHODS:

Patients were randomized 1:1:1 to 0.3 mg ranibizumab (n = 60), 0.5 mg ranibizumab (n = 61), or sham (n = 63) treatment groups. The primary efficacy endpoint was mean change from baseline visual acuity (VA) at month 12.

RESULTS:

Mean changes from baseline VA at 12 months were -16.3, -1.6, and -0.2 letters for the sham, 0.3 mg, and 0.5 mg groups, respectively (P < or = .0001, each ranibizumab dose vs sham). Ranibizumab arrested CNV growth and reduced leakage from CNV. However, the treatment effect declined in the ranibizumab groups during quarterly dosing (e.g., at three months the mean changes from baseline VA had been gains of 2.9 and 4.3 letters for the 0.3 mg and 0.5 mg doses, respectively). Results of subgroups analyses of mean change from baseline VA at 12 months by baseline age, VA, and lesion characteristics were consistent with the overall results. Few serious ocular or nonocular adverse events occurred in any group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ranibizumab administered monthly for three months and then quarterly provided significant VA benefit to patients with AMD-related subfoveal CNV and was well tolerated. The incidence of serious ocular or nonocular adverse events was low.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00090623.

PMID:
18222192
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2007.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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