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J Vis. 2007 Mar 9;7(2):10.1-13. doi: 10.1167/7.2.10.

Crowding between first- and second-order letter stimuli in normal foveal and peripheral vision.

Author information

1
College of Optometry & Center for Neuro-Engineering and Cognitive Science, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA. schung@optometry.uh.edu

Abstract

Evidence that the detection of first- and second-order visual stimuli is processed by separate pathways abounds. This study asked whether first- and second-order stimuli remain independent at the stage of processing where crowding occurs. We measured thresholds for identifying a first-order (luminance defined) or second-order (contrast defined) target letter in the presence of two second- or first-order flanking letters. For comparison, we also measured thresholds when the target and flanking letters were all first or second order. Contrast of the flankers was 1.6 times their respective contrast thresholds. Measurements were obtained at the fovea and 10 degrees in the lower visual field of four normally sighted observers. Two observers were also tested at 10 degrees nasal visual field. As expected, in both the fovea and periphery, the magnitude of crowding (threshold elevation) was maximal at the closest letter separation and decreased as letter separation increased. The magnitude of crowding was greater for second- than for first-order target letters, independent of the order type of flankers; however, the critical distance for crowding was similar for first- and second-order letters. Substantial crossover crowding occurred when the target and flanking letters were of different order type. Our finding of substantial interaction between first- and second-order stimuli suggests that the processing of these stimuli is not independent at the stage of processing at which crowding occurs.

PMID:
18217825
PMCID:
PMC2747649
DOI:
10.1167/7.2.10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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