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Ther Umsch. 2007 Oct;64(10):567-74.

[Chronic fatigue syndrome--a functional somatic syndrome].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Abteilung f├╝r Psychosomatik, Bereich Medizin, Universit├Ątsspital Basel. alinde@uhbs.ch

Abstract

Chronic fatigue can be categorized as a functional somatic syndrome (fss), because there are findings of typical preconditions, trigger mechanisms and maintaining conditions. With relevance for therapy it makes sense to see it as an medical-psychiatric interface-disorder Subsyndromal short episodes of chronic fatigue are many more frequent as three or six month during clearly diagnosed episodes of "neurasthenia" or "chronic fatigue syndrome". Their descriptions are very similar and obvious those means the same matter. For original aetiological assumptions it wasn't any evidence. But there are findings of charcteristical patterns of changed neurhumeral and immunological interactions for the chronic fatigue syndrome, common for fss. Especially changes of HPA-Axis and its interactions with other systems of functional regulation. Another importent fact are increased senzitation in neuronal and neurocognitive regulation. Increased critical appraisal of somatic funtions and dysfunctional coping strategies are maintaining factors at least. Patterns of dysfuntional coping are not a problem of patients alone. There are also experiences, that some doctors shows the same dysfunctional somatizing management of fss in general and especially for chronic fatigue. In fact, a single and specific cause of chronic fatigue doesn't exist. But the above-mentioned facts allows a starting point for a more successful treatment. There are reviews that shows a good evidence for therapeutic procedures wich are calling for acticvity by patients, such cognitive behavioral therapy and graduated activation. Antidepressants, especialy SSRI, are helpful with a small evidence. They can be used to increase treatment effects. There is no evidence for therapies without patients activation.

PMID:
18214210
DOI:
10.1024/0040-5930.64.10.567
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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