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Occup Med (Lond). 2008 Mar;58(2):107-14. doi: 10.1093/occmed/kqm142. Epub 2008 Jan 21.

Violence risks in nursing--results from the European 'NEXT' Study.

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1
Service Central de Médecine du Travail Hôpitaux Hôtel Dieu AP-HP de Paris, Paris, France. madeleine.estryn-behar@sap.aphp-paris.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent research suggests that violence in health care is increasing and that it strongly influences the recruitment and retention of nurses as well as sick leave and burnout levels.

AIMS:

To identify the prevalence of violence in nursing and to provide a basis for appropriate interventions.

METHODS:

Nurses from 10 European countries answered to a questionnaire and to a follow-up assessment. Stepwise adjusted multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association between frequency of violence, factors related to teamwork and other work-related factors and outcomes, such as burnout, intention to leave nursing and intention to change institution.

RESULTS:

A total of 39,894 nurses responded to the baseline questionnaire (51% response rate). After adjustment for age, gender and other risk factors, quality of teamwork appeared to be a major factor with odds ratio (OR) 1.35 (1.24-1.48) for medium quality and 1.52 (1.33-1.74) for low quality. Uncertainty regarding patients' treatments was linked with violence, with a clear gradient (OR 1.59, 1.47-1.72 for medium uncertainty and 2.13, 1.88-2.41 for high uncertainty). Working only night shift was at high risk (OR 2.17, 1.76-2.67). High levels of time pressure and physical load were associated with violence OR 1.45 (1.24-1.69) and 1.84 (1.66-2.04), respectively. High and medium frequency of violence was associated with higher levels of burnout, intent to leave nursing and intent to change institution. A 1-year follow-up assessment indicated stability in the relationships between outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

This study supports efforts aimed at improving teamwork-related factors as they are associated with a decrease in violence against nurses.

PMID:
18211910
DOI:
10.1093/occmed/kqm142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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