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JAMA. 1991 Dec 4;266(21):3004-7.

Incidence and risk factors for gout in white men.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular and Clinical Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify potentially modifiable risk factors for the development of gout.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal cohort study (The Johns Hopkins Precursors Study).

PARTICIPANTS:

Of 1337 eligible medical students, 1271 (95%) received a standardized medical examination and questionnaire during medical school. The participants were predominantly male (91%), white (97%), and young (median age, 22 years) at cohort entry.

OUTCOME MEASURE:

The development of gout.

RESULTS:

Sixty cases of gout (47 primary and 13 secondary) were identified among 1216 men; none occurred among 121 women (P = .01). The cumulative incidence of all gout was 8.6% among men (95% confidence interval, 5.9% to 11.3%). Body mass index at age 35 years (P = .01), excessive weight gain (greater than 1.88 kg/m2) between cohort entry and age 35 years (P = .007), and development of hypertension (P = .004) were significant risk factors for all gout in univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models confirmed the association of body mass index at age 35 years (relative risk [RR] = 1.12; P = .02), excessive weight gain (RR = 2.07; P = .02), and hypertension (RR = 3.26; P = .002) as risk factors for all gout. Hypertension, however, was not a significant risk factor for primary gout.

CONCLUSIONS:

Obesity, excessive weight gain in young adulthood, and hypertension are risk factors for the development of gout. Prevention of obesity and hypertension may decrease the incidence of and morbidity from gout; studies of weight reduction in the primary and secondary prevention of gout are indicated.

PMID:
1820473
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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