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J Vet Intern Med. 2007 Nov-Dec;21(6):1409-12.

Mushroom-derived maitake PETfraction as single agent for the treatment of lymphoma in dogs.

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1
Harrington Oncology Program, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maitake PETfraction is a standardized essence extracted from the mushroom Maitake (Grifola frondosa) that has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing mice. In addition, PETfraction induces apoptosis in human prostate and bladder cancer cells and suppresses the proliferation in vitro of several canine tumor cell lines, such as lymphoma (Cl-1), mammary gland (CF33), and connective tissue (CF21).

HYPOTHESIS:

Maitake PETfraction is effective as a single agent in dogs with lymphoma.

ANIMALS:

Fifteen dogs with confirmed intermediate or high-grade lymphoma were enrolled into this prospective, noncontrolled, clinical trial. Inclusion criteria were an expected survival time of at least 2 weeks and no major organ dysfunction.

METHODS:

Maitake PETfraction was administered at a dose of 3 drops/kg/day divided into 2 doses given 1 hour before feeding. Dogs were evaluated by physical examination with tumor measurement, body weight, CBC, and chemistry profile before treatment and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. At each visit, owners completed a questionnaire addressing overall quality of life, appetite, and any adverse effects noted.

RESULTS:

A decrease in lymph node size of greater than 50% (objective response) was not seen in any of the dogs. Thirteen dogs developed progressive disease before the 4th week. The median treatment duration was 27 days (range, 9-228). PETfraction was well accepted, and minimal adverse effects were observed. Two dogs developed hyphema. It was not known if this was related to progressive lymphoma or was an adverse effect of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

No objective responses were observed to administration of Maitake PETfraction, and the drug was well tolerated in these dogs.

PMID:
18196755
DOI:
10.1892/07-070.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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